Yorkshire hospitals adopt Surgical’s technology

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KEYHOLE surgery instruments maker Surgical Innovations has seen a 59 per cent increase in the number of Yorkshire hospitals using its branded products.

The Leeds-based group has set itself an ambitious target - to get every hospital in Yorkshire using its products.

​​Surgical’s chief executive Graham Bowland said: “That is the goal of the company as a Leeds-based, Yorkshire-based company - to get all the hospitals in Yorkshire using Surgical’s products and that will save them money.

“Every procedure we can save them money. The NHS is finally realising that.”

The group said the US is also a key market and the company is broadening sales channels there. So far new dealer relationships across the US have resulted in a 75 per cent increase in sales of SI branded products.

Surgical said its “resposable” instruments are proving very popular. These part reusable and part disposable instruments consist of a long lasting reusable element and cheap throwaway parts that are only used once.

M​r​ Bowland said the instruments can save £300 per operation​,​ which could offer the NHS savings of tens of millions of pounds.

Speaking at the group’s AGM in Leeds yesterday, ​Surgical’s chairman, Doug Liversidge told shareholders: “We are confident that our investment choices and strategic decisions will result in future growth.

“We continue to build upon last year’s strong growth both in the UK and US.

“The resposable concept provides a cost-saving solution to the NHS which is committed to cost reduction programs in UK hospitals. During 2013, there was a 59 per cent increase in the number of Yorkshire hospitals using SI branded products.”

He said that the product development pipeline is being strengthened by investment in its 3mm technology.

The 3mm instruments leave holes small enough to close up without leaving a scar.

Earlier this month Chris Rea, the founder of AES Engineering, bought a nine per cent stake in Surgical for £1.6m.

Mr Rea, OBE, is taking on a non-executive director role at the firm.

Graham Pearce of KPMG

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