Bush's man makes independent bid for Yorkshire seat

EXCLUSIVE By Neil Hudson A FORMER advisor to American president George W Bush is fighting the Dewsbury seat as an independent.

Alan Girvan said today he thought he could be the right man in the right place for fed-up voters.

Father-of-two Mr Girvan, 36, was born and educated in Heckmondwike.

He is a film director, writer and producer and recently left his job as IT sales account manager at AA Training, Batley, to fight the election.

He was immediately involved in the United State's response to the 9/11 terrorist attacks in 2001 when he was called on by Mr Bush's former cyber security chief, Richard Clarke, to create a secure airport computer system.

Invitation

Mr Girvan said he had been previously been invited to the US to create an alternative to the Internet.

"It was when I was working on that, the 9/11 attacks took place and I was one of the people they called in to ask about setting up a secure computer system for airports."

The idea was rejected by Congress because of the cost.

Mr Girvan said of his decision to stand in Dewsbury: "I think there is a sense of apathy and despair but you don't have to vote for the same old parties.

"I am standing on a number of issues, important to Dewsbury, chief among which is the state of the hospital. Taxpayers are paying a lot of money, yet they still might have to spend 40 on a taxi to get to Pinderfields, or get six buses.

"I am also concerned about the future of Dewsbury Market and our estates, which need funding. The people have long lost out to a Huddersfield-centred Kirklees."

He added that the politicians had over-estimated people's feelings about Iraq.

"It might be a bigger issue down south but in this area I think people are more bothered about heroin addicts shooting up in the street, or burgling to feed their habit."

Other candidates are Shahid Malik (Lab); Sayeeda Warsi (Tory); Kingsley Hill (Lib Dem); Brenda Smithson (Green); Alan Girvan (IND) and David Exley (BNP).

Graham Pearce of KPMG

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