Bringing history to life at National Coal Mining Museum

LOOKING BACK: Andy Driffield of Armley and Stephen Taylor of Garforth.
LOOKING BACK: Andy Driffield of Armley and Stephen Taylor of Garforth.
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A re-enactment group brought scenes from World War Two into the modern day as the hosted ‘living history’ camps at the National Coal Mining Museum.

The Northern World War Two Association set up authentic living history encampments displaying a mixture of genuine and replica equipment, weapons and uniforms, incorporating firing displays and battle re-enactments, at Overton, near Wakefield.

The event’s aim is to try to inform, educate and help people understand the conflict from the several viewpoints. Established in 2005, the Northern World War II Association unites a variety of 1940s living history and re-enactment groups.

Each group portrays a different aspect of the Second World War and aims to give visitors a feel for what it was like to live through, one of the largest and bloodiest conflicts in human history.

Partick Whelan and Gareth Hayes.

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