Boss claims Leeds’ mental health services would have been rated as ‘good’ if inspected alone

Chris Butler, chief executive of Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust.
Chris Butler, chief executive of Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust.
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Leeds’ mental health services would likely have been rated as ‘good’ if they had been inspected alone, a health care trust boss has claimed.

Chris Butler, chief executive of Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust (LYPFT), stated his belief in the quality of service provided in the city following the trust’s review by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) watchdog last week.

LYPFT delivers mental health services to over 30,000 people in Leeds, York, Selby and areas of North Yorkshire but the CQC deemed its overall performance as requiring improvement.

Mr Butler had stated that the report was a “tale of two cities” due to failings in York but went further at a meeting of Leeds City Council’s Scrutiny Board for Health and Well-being and Adult Social Care today. He said: “If Leeds was inspected in isolation we most likely would have rated as good rather than requires improvement.”

He added that LYPFT is “not taking its eye off the Leeds ball” despite work around crisis assessment, street triage, Leeds’ rehabilitation wards and Linden House being praised. Meanwhile in York major concerns were voiced over Bootham Park Hospital, which was deemed “not fit for purpose”.

Some regional issues were highlighted by the CQC surrounding complaints and risk assessments. Anthony Deery, interim director for nursing and quality at LYPFT, admitted: “We are not very agile when it comes to complaints.”

Trust chiefs will send an action plan for improvements to the CQC in mid February.

The West Indian Carnival, Chapeltown, Leeds.29th August 2016 ..Picture by Simon Hulme

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