A weighty role! Leeds’s Kay Mellor is looking for local lad to star in Fat Friends The Musical

Kay Mellor.
Kay Mellor.
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Leeds writer Kay Mellor is on the lookout for a local lad to fill a heavyweight role in her new Fat Friends The Musical stage show.

Kay has announced that she wants to cast someone who is “born and bred Yorkshire” to play the part of Alan in the production, which premieres at Leeds Grand Theatre later this year before embarking on a UK tour.

Her plan is for Alan – described as a working-class ambulance driver who loves his food but struggles with his weight – to be portrayed by a Tyke aged between 30 and 55.

The actor playing him can come from any ethnic background but must have a bass/baritone singing range.

Kay said: “I am very much looking to cast the role of Alan with a man who is born and bred Yorkshire.

“I’m hoping to find somebody with a strong Yorkshire accent, who can sing as well as act.

“I know we have real talent in this county so I’m hoping it will spark the interest of many budding or established actors living in Yorkshire.”

People who fancy a crack at the role of Alan are asked to send a CV and image to casting director Stephen Crockett at Ella@grindrodcasting.co.uk by Friday, August 18.

Final auditions will take place at Leeds Grand on September 1.

The successful applicant will need to be available from October 2 to June 9 next year.

Stars already cast for Fat Friends The Musical – which will feature music by Nicholas Lloyd Webber – include Jodie Prenger, Sam Bailey, Andrew ‘Freddie’ Flintoff and Natalie Anderson.

The new stage show is based on Kay’s hugely-popular TV drama Fat Friends, which followed the stories of a group of slimming club members in Leeds and ran from 2000 to 2005.

It opens at Leeds Grand on November 7 and will be on at the theatre until December 2.

For ticket information, visit the www.leedsgrandtheatre.com website or ring the box office on 0844 848 2700.

Paula Dillon, President of Leeds Chamber Commerce.

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